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Astrodynamics to exit the solar system at the highest speed

Part of the Springer Praxis Books book series (PRAXIS)

Abstract

To this author’s knowledge, the first paper dealing with the problem of making a spacecraft exit the solar system at the maximum possible speed was published in 1972 by [1]. The abstract of his paper summarizes his results: “For optimum propulsion energy management, the departing spacecraft should use a powered flyby maneuver at Saturn for insertion into a retrograde heliocentric orbit, followed by a Jupiter gravity-assist for injection into a hyperbolic orbit such that a final powered maneuver is applied at closest perihelion distance and highest perihelion approach velocity possible.” Later, an algebraic error present in Ehricke’s paper was corrected by [2]. Again we quote from the abstract: “An error in some previous considerations of gravity-assist interstellar propulsion is pointed out and corrected. The revised analysis is applied to powered and unpowered periapsis maneuvers.”

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References

  1. [1]
    K. A. Von Ehricke, “Saturn-Jupiter Rebound—A method of High-Speed Spacecraft Ejection from the Solar System,” Journal of the British Interplanetary Society, 25 (1972), 561–571.ADSGoogle Scholar
  2. [2]
    G. Matloff, and K. Parks, “Interstellar Gravity Assist Propulsion: A Correction and a New Application,” Journal of the British Interplanetary Society, 41 (1988), 519–526.Google Scholar
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    L. S. Marochnik, and L. M. Mukhin, “Belt of Life in the Galaxy,” in “Bioastronomy—The Next Steps,” Proceedings of the 99th Colloquium of the International Astronomical Union, held in Balatonfüred, Hungary, June 22–27, 1987, George Marx (editor), Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, The Netherlands, 1988, pp. 49–59.Google Scholar
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    B. Balázs,“The Galactic Belt of Intelligent Life”, in “Bioastronomy—The Next Steps,” Proceedings of the 99th Colloquium of the International Astronomical Union, held in Balatonfüred, Hungary, June 22–27, 1987, George Marx (editor), Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, The Netherlands, 1988, pp. 61–66.Google Scholar
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    K. Nock, “TAU—A Mission to a Thousand Astronomical Units,” paper #AIAA-87-1049 presented at the 19th AIAA/DGLR/JSASS International Electric Propulsion Conference, May 11–13, 1987, Colorado Springs, CO.Google Scholar
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    G. Vulpetti, “3D High-Speed Escape Heliocentric Trajectories by All-Metallic-Sail Low-Mass-Sailcraft,” paper IAA-L-0505 presented at the Second IAA International Conference on Low-Cost Planetary Missions held April 16–19, 1996, at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, W. Farquhar (coordinator), and then printed in Ada Astronautica, 39(1–4) (1996), 161–170.Google Scholar

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© Praxis Publishing Ltd, Chichester, UK 2009

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