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Mars mission analysis

Part of the Springer Praxis Books book series (PRAXIS)

Abstract

From 1988 to 2006, NASA conducted a number of paper studies of requirements and approaches for human missions to the Moon and Mars.

Keywords

Exploration Case Study Surface Laboratory Mars Mission Mars Surface International Astronautical 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Praxis Publishing Ltd, Chichester, UK 2008

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