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Getting there and back

Part of the Springer Praxis Books book series (PRAXIS)

Abstract

While there are many challenges involved in planning human missions to Mars, the problems involved in launching, transporting, landing, and returning large masses from these bodies appear to be perhaps the most formidable of these hurdles.

Keywords

Exploration Study Large Mass Propulsion System Aerospace Technology Trajectory Analysis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Praxis Publishing Ltd, Chichester, UK 2008

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