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Executing Semantic Web Services with a Context-Aware Service Execution Agent

  • António Luís Lopes
  • Luís Miguel Botelho
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 4504)

Abstract

The need to add semantic information to web-accessible services has created a growing research activity in this area. Standard initiatives such as OWL-S and WSDL enable the automation of discovery, composition and execution of semantic web services, i.e. they create a Semantic Web, such that computer programs or agents can implement an open, reliable, large-scale dynamic network of Web Services. This paper presents the research on agent technology development for context-aware execution of semantic web services, more specifically, the development of the Service Execution Agent (SEA). SEA uses context information to adapt the semantic web services execution process to a specific situation, thus improving its effectiveness and providing a faster and better service to its clients. Preliminary results show that context-awareness (e.g., the introduction of context information) in a service execution environment can speed up the execution process, in spite of the overhead that it is introduced by the agents’ communication and processing of context information.

Keywords

Context-awareness Semantic Web Service Execution  Agents 

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Copyright information

© Springer Berlin Heidelberg 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • António Luís Lopes
    • 1
  • Luís Miguel Botelho
    • 1
  1. 1.We, the Body, and the Mind Research Lab of ADETTI-ISCTE, Avenida das Forças Armadas, Edifício ISCTE, 1600-082 LisboaPortugal

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