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Raman Spectroscopy: New Light on Ancient Artefacts

  • Peter Vandenabeele
  • L. Moens
Part of the Springer proceedings in physics book series (SPPHY, volume 116)

Raman spectroscopy, being a laser spectroscopic method, is gaining increasingly more interest for applications in the field of art and archaeology. The technique is especially appreciated for its non-destructive character, the speed of analysis and the ability to obtain molecular information on a whole range of materials, organic as well as inorganic. Although the Raman effect was observed for the first time in 1928, it was not until the end of the 1980s before instrumental improvements enabled the analysis of micro-samples, and thus allowing the application of this method in archaeometry.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter Vandenabeele
    • 1
  • L. Moens
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Analytical ChemistryGhent UniversityGhentBelgium

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