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3D City Modelling from LIDAR Data

  • Rebecca O.C. Tse
  • Christopher Gold
  • Dave Kidner
Part of the Lecture Notes in Geoinformation and Cartography book series (LNGC)

Abstract

Airborne Laser Surveying (ALS) or LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) becomes more and more popular because it provides a rapid 3D data collection over a massive area. The captured 3D data contains terrain models, forestry, 3D buildings and so on. Current research combines other data resources on extracting building information or uses pre-defined building models to fit the roof structures. However we want to find an alternative solution to reconstruct the 3D buildings without any additional data sources and predefined roof styles. Therefore our challenge is to use the captured data only and covert them into CAD-type models containing walls, roof planes and terrain which can be rapidly displayed from any 3D viewpoint.

Keywords

Global Position System Delaunay Triangulation Inertial Measuring Unit Lidar Data Voronoi Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rebecca O.C. Tse
    • 1
  • Christopher Gold
    • 1
  • Dave Kidner
    • 1
  1. 1.University of GlamorganPontypriddWales, UK

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