An HCI Model for Usability of Sonification Applications

  • Ag. Asri Ag. Ibrahim
  • Andy Hunt
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 4385)

Abstract

Sonification is a representation of data using sounds with the intention of communication and interpretation. The process and technique of converting the data into sound is called the sonification technique. One or more techniques might be required by a sonification application. However, sonification techniques are not always suitable for all kinds of data, and often custom techniques are used - where the design is tailored to the domain and nature of the data as well as the users’ required tasks within the application. Therefore, it is important to assure the usability of the technique for the specific domain application being developed. This paper describes a new HCI Model for usability of sonification applications. It consists of two other models, namely the Sonification Application (SA) Model and User Interpretation Construction (UIC) Model. The SA model will be used to explain the application from the designer’s point of view. The UIC Model will be used to explain what the user might perceive and understand.

Keywords

Usability Sonification Usability Inspection Human Computer Interaction (HCI) Usability Inspection Material Perception 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Kramer, G.: Auditory Displays Sonification, Audification and Auditory interfaces. In: Proceeding Volume XVIII, Santa Fe Institute, Studies in the Science of Complexity, Addison-Wesley, Reading (1994)Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Scaletti, C.: Sound Synthesis Algorithms for Auditory Data Representations. In: Proceedings Volume XVIII, Santa Fe Institute, Studies in the Science of Complexity, Addison-Wesley, Reading (1994)Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Sonification Report: Status of the Field and Research Agenda. Prepared for the National Science Foundations.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Coren, S., Ward, L.M., Enns, J.T.: Sensation and Perception, 5th edn. Harcourt Brace College Publishers, Fort Worth (1999)Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Pauletto, S., Hunt, A.: A Toolkit for Interactive Sonification. In: Proceeding of The 2004 International Conference on Auditory Display (2004)Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Hermann, T.: Sonification for Exploratory Data Analysis. PHD Thesis, University of Bielefeld, Germany (2002)Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Dufresne, A., et al.: Sound, Space and Metaphor: Multimodal Access to Windows for Blind Users. In: Proceeding of 1996 International Conference on Auditory Display (1996)Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Brewster, S.A.: Providing a Structured Method for Integrating Non-Speech Audio into Human-Computer Interface. PhD Thesis, University of York (1994), Webpage: http://www.dcs.gla.ac.uk/~stephen/papers/theses/Brewster_thesis.pdf, Downloaded: Jan. 2005
  9. 9.
    Stevens, R.: Principles for The Design of Auditory Interfaces to Present Complex Information to Blind Computer Users. PhD Thesis, University of York (1996) Webpage: http://www.cs.man.ac.uk/~stevensr/papers/thesis-rds.pdf, Downloaded: Jan. 2005
  10. 10.
    Vickers, P., Alty, J.L.: Musical Program Auralisation: Empirical Studies. In: Proceeding of the 2000 International Conference on Auditory Display (2000)Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Edwards, A.D.N., et al.: Development of a Standard Test of Musical Ability for Participants in Auditory Interface Testing. Proceedings of the 2000 International Conference on Auditory Display (2000) Website: http://www-users.cs.york.ac.uk/~alistair/publications/pdf/MAT.pdf, Downloaded: January 2001
  12. 12.
    Brewster, S.A., Wright, P.C., Edwards, A.D.N.: A Detailed Investigation into the Effectiveness of Earcons. In: The Proceedings of The 1992 International Conference on Auditory Display (1992)Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Lodha, S.K., et al.: MUSE: A Musical Data Sonification Toolkit. In: Proceeding of the 1997 International Conference on Auditory Display (1997)Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Stevens, C., Brennan, D., Parker, S.: Simultaneous Manipulation of Parameters of Auditory Icons to Convey Direction, Size and Distance: Effects on Recognition and Interpretation. In: Proceedings of the 2004 International Conference on Auditory Display (2004)Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Alty, J.L., Rigas, D.I.: Communicating Graphical Information to Blind Users Using Music: The Role of Context. In: CHI 98, Los Angeles, CA, USA (1998)Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Stevens, R.D., et al.: Design and Evaluation of an Auditory Glance at Algebra for Blind Readers. In: Proceeding of the 1994 International Conference on Auditory Display (1994)Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Edworthy, J., Hellier, E.: Designing Urgency into Sound. In: Proceeding of Design Sonore Conference 2002, Paris (2002)Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Leplatre, G., McGregor, I.: How to Tackle Auditory Interface Aesthetics? Discussion and Case Study. In: Proceeding of the 2004 International Conference on Auditory Display (2004)Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    Rober, N., Masuch, M.: Interacting With Sound: An Interaction Paradigm For Virtual Auditory Worlds. In: Proceedings of the 2003 International Conference on Auditory Display, Sydney, Australia (2004)Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Cunningham, B.S., Ihlefeld, A.: Selective and Divided Attention: Extracting Information From Simultaneous Sound Sources. In: Proceeding of the 2004 International Conference of Auditory Display, Australia (2004)Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    Daude, S., Nigay, L.: Design Process for Auditory Interfaces. In: International Conference on Auditory Display, Boston, USA (2003)Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    Janata, P., Childs, E.: Marketbuzz: Sonification of Real-time Financial Data. In: Proceeding of the 2004 International Conference on Auditory Display, Sydney, Australia (2004)Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    Zhao, H., et al.: Sonification of Geo-Referenced data for Auditory Information Seeking: Design Principle and Pilot Study. In: Proceedings of the 2004 International Conference on Auditory Display (2004)Google Scholar
  24. 24.
    Neilsen, J.: Usability Engineering. Academic Press, London (1993)Google Scholar
  25. 25.
    Florian, D.: Using Audification in Planetary Seismology. In: Proceeding of the 2001 International Conference on Auditory Display (2001)Google Scholar
  26. 26.
    Barrass, S.: Auditory Information Design. Phd Thesis, The Australian National University (1997)Google Scholar
  27. 27.
    Malandrino, D., et al.: NeMoS: Network Monitoring with Sound. In: Proceeding of the 2003 International Conference on Auditory Display, Boston, USA (2003)Google Scholar
  28. 28.
    Norman, D.A.: The Design of Everyday things (1988, Third printing 2000), 1st edn. MIT Press, Cambridge (1998)Google Scholar
  29. 29.
    Gaver, W.W.: Using and Creating Auditory Icons. In: Proceeding Volume XVIII, Santa Fe Institute, Studies in the Science of Complexity, Addison-Wesley, Reading (1994)Google Scholar
  30. 30.
    Bevan, N., Macleod, M.: Usability Measurement in Context. Behaviour and Information Technology 13, 132–145 (1994)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. 31.
    Bevan, N.: Usability is Quality of Use. In: Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Human Interaction, Yokohama (1995)Google Scholar
  32. 32.
    Bevan, N.: International Standard for HCI and Usability. International Journal of Human Computer Studies 55(4), 533–552 (2001)MATHCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. 33.
    Bevan, N., Kirakowski, J., Maissel, J.: What is Usability? In: Proceeding of the 4th International Conference on HCI, Stuttgart (1991)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ag. Asri Ag. Ibrahim
    • 1
    • 2
  • Andy Hunt
    • 1
  1. 1.The University of York, Heslington, YO10 5DD, YorkUnited Kingdom
  2. 2.University Malaysia Sabah, Lock Bag No.2073, 88999 Kota, Kinabalu, SabahMalaysia

Personalised recommendations