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Monitoring of Environmentally Hazardous Exhaust Emissions from Cars Using Optical Fibre Sensors

  • Elfed Lewis
  • John Clifford
  • Colin Fitzpatrick
  • Gerard Dooly
  • Weizhong Zhao
  • Tong Sun
  • Ken Grattan
  • James Lucas
  • Martin Degner
  • Hartmut Ewald
  • Steffen Lochmann
  • Gero Bramann
  • Edoardo Merlone-Borla
  • Flavio Gili
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 5114)

Abstract

Results are presented for on board sensing of the Gases NO, NO2, SO2 and CO2. The optical fibre sensor was connected downstream of the Diesel Particle Filter (DPF) of a Fiat Croma and the measurements from the optical fibre sensors were recorded simultaneously using high specification reference instrumentation mounted in the boot of the car. In this way the results from the optical fibre sensors and the reference instrumentation could be directly compared. The results from the optical fibre sensors indicate that they are capable of measuring single ppm values of NO, NO2 and SO2 as required by the EURO IV standards and CO2 up to a concentration of 15% which is more than adequate for in car monitoring. The optical fibre sensors therefore performed well when compared to the reference instrumentation in tests conducted on a rolling road and during “free driving” on an urban road.

Keywords

mid-infrared gas detection UV gas detection in-fibre Bragg grating temperature sensor optical fibre sensor vehicle emission detection 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elfed Lewis
    • 1
  • John Clifford
    • 1
  • Colin Fitzpatrick
    • 1
  • Gerard Dooly
    • 1
  • Weizhong Zhao
    • 2
  • Tong Sun
    • 2
  • Ken Grattan
    • 2
  • James Lucas
    • 3
  • Martin Degner
    • 4
  • Hartmut Ewald
    • 4
  • Steffen Lochmann
    • 5
  • Gero Bramann
    • 5
  • Edoardo Merlone-Borla
    • 6
  • Flavio Gili
    • 6
  1. 1.Department of Electronic & Computer EngineeringUniversity of LimerickIreland
  2. 2.School of Engineering & Mathematical SciencesCity UniversityLondonUK
  3. 3.Department of Electrical Engineering & ElectronicsUniversity of LiverpoolLiverpoolUK
  4. 4.Institute of General Electrical EngineeringUniversity of RostockGermany
  5. 5.Department of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science WismarGermany
  6. 6.Advanced Manufacturing and MaterialsCentro Ricerche FiatOrbassano (TO)Italy

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