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Land Use Analysis

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Abstract

As we discussed at the beginning of the book, the four planning analyses covered in this book answer questions related to “Who”, “What to do”, “Where” and “What connection.” Land use analysis studies where and what types of human activities are taking place. Most human activities, such as employment, recreation, or residence, are linked to land. A land use study is one way of understanding those activities. A land use study may also focus on the land itself. Different activities may place different requirements on land and their impacts also vary. Through land use analysis, we can understand if a piece of land is suitable for a given activity. Also, we can understand the consequences of human activities and how they change the landscape.

Keywords

Geographic Information System Regional Planning Land Development Land Suitability Residential Development 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Tsinghua University Press, Beijing and Springer-Verlag GmbH Berlin Heidelberg 2007

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