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Numerical Investigation of Magnetohydrodynamic Effects in Real Gas Flows

  • Ramesh K. Agarwal
  • Anurag Gupta
Conference paper
  • 271 Downloads
Part of the Notes on Numerical Fluid Mechanics (NNFM) book series (NNFM, volume 78)

Summary

A compressible viscous magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) solver has been developed to investigate the use of MHD control techniques in the weakly ionized gas flows found in several hypersonic regimes. Numerical solutions are obtained by solving Powell’s 8-wave formulation of the governing equations in generalized coordinates using a modified Runge-Kutta time integration scheme and second-order accurate spatial discretization. The symmetric Davis-Yee Total Variation Diminishing (TVD) flux limiters are employed. The capability to simulate the behavior of real gases by including equilibrium air curve-fits has been added to the code that also includes models for variable electrical conductivity. A study of the effect of magnetic fields on scramjet inlet flows with air assumed to be frozen and in thermo-chemical equilibrium is presented.

Keywords

AIAA Paper Total Variation Diminishing Flux Limiter Variable Electrical Conductivity Shock Standoff Distance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Nomenclature

γ

Specific heat ratio

λ

Eigenvalue

Фξ'Фη

Flux limiter functions

μf

Magnetic permeability of the fluid

τ

Viscous stress tensor

α

Degree of ionization

σ

Variable electrical conductivity

ρ

Gas density

δ,δ

Entropy correction variables

vfξ,vfη

Fast wave velocities in ξ,η directions

ξ,η

Generalized coordinate parameters

Vsξ,Vsη

Slow wave velocities in ξ,η directions

B

Magnetic field vector

Bx

Magnetic field component,x-direction

By

Magnetic field component,y-direction

Bz

Magnetic field component,z-direction

Cs

Speed of sound

E

Electric field vector

E

Flux vector component in x-direction

et

Total energy per unit mass

F

Flux vector component,y-direction

g

Limiter function

I

Identity tensor

J

Electrical current density vector

J

Jacobian of transformation

k

Boltzmann constant,1.38×10−23J/K

M

Freestream Mach number

P

Pressure

Pr

Prandtl number

Q*

MHD Interaction parameter

Q

Field vector

q

Heat flux vector

Re

Reynolds number

Rem

Magnetic Reynolds number

T,Ttran

Translational temperature

Te

Electron Temperature

Tυ

Vibrational Temperature

u

Velocity component in the x-direction

v

Velocity component in the y-direction

V

Velocity vector

V

Free-stream velocity

Vax

Alfven wave velocity,x-direction

Vay

Alfven wave celocity,y-direction

W

Velocity component in the z-direction

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ramesh K. Agarwal
    • 1
  • Anurag Gupta
    • 1
  1. 1.National Institute for Aviation ResearchWichita State UniversityWichitaUSA

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