Advertisement

Computational Methods for Parachute Aerodynamics

  • T. Tezduyar
  • Y. Osawa
  • K. Stein
  • R. Benney
  • V. Kumar
  • J. McCune
Conference paper
Part of the Notes on Numerical Fluid Mechanics (NNFM) book series (NNFM, volume 78)

Summary

We highlight some recent methods developed by the Team for Advanced Flow Simulation and Modeling http://www.mems.rice.edu/TAFSM/ for computation of parachute aerodynamics and fluid-structure interactions. This class of problems involve several computational challenges, including computation of unsteady long-wake flows generated by cargo aircraft carrying paratroopers and the affect of that unsteady wake on a parachute crossing it, as well as parachute aeromechanics simulations that take into account the changes in the parachute shape. Among the numerical methods we have developed to address these challenges are: a multi-domain method for computation of long-wake flows and flow around objects placed in such wakes, methods for the simultaneous solution of the fluid and structural mechanics equations governing the aeromechanics of a parachute. and advanced mesh moving methods. Our presentation here includes numerical examples that demonstrate the new computer simulation capabilities offered by the methods we have developed.

Keywords

Finite Element Formulation Wake Flow Canopy Surface Test Function Space Unsteady Wake 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. [1]
    T.E. Tezduyar, M. Behr, and J. Liou, “A new strategy for finite element cornputations involving moving boundaries and interfaces -- the deforming-spatialdomain,space-time procedure: I. The concept and the preliminary tests”, Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering, 94 (1992) 339–351.MathSciNetzbMATHCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. [2]
    T.E. Tezduyar, M. Behr, S. Mittal, and J. Liou, “A new strategy for finite element computations involving moving boundaries and interfaces — the deformingspatial-domain,space-time procedure: II. Computation of free-surface flows, two-liquid flows, and flows with drifting cylinders”, Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering, 94 (1992) 353–371.MathSciNetzbMATHCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. [3]
    K. Stein, R. Benney, V. Kairo, T.E. Tezduyar, J. Leonard, and M. Accorsi, “Parachute fluid-structure interactions: 3-D Computation”, to appear in Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering.Google Scholar
  4. [4]
    T.E. Tezduyar, M. Behr, S. Mittal, and A.A. Johnson, “Computation of unsteady incompressible flows with the finite element methods — space-time formulations, iterative strategies and massively parallel implementations”, in P. Smolinski, W.K. Liu, G. Hulbert, and K. Tamma, editors, New Methods in Transient Analysis, AMDVol. 143, ASME, New York, (1992) 7–24.Google Scholar
  5. [5]
    T.E. Tezduyar and Y. Osawa, “Methods for parallel computation of complex flow problems”, Parallel Computing, 25 (1999) 2039–2066.MathSciNetCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. [6]
    T.E. Tezduyar, “Stabilized finite element formulations for incompressible flow computations”, Advances in Applied Mechanics, 28 (1991) 1–44.MathSciNetCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. [7]
    A.N. Brooks and T.J.R. Hughes, “Streamline upwind,Petrov-Galerkin formulations for convection dominated flows with particular emphasis on the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations”, Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering, 32 (1982) 199–259.MathSciNetzbMATHCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. [8]
    K.J. Bathe, Finite Element Procedures. Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1996.Google Scholar
  9. [9]
    A. Lo, Nonlinear Dynamic Analysis of Cable and Membrane Structure, Ph.D. thesis, Department of Civil Engineering, Oregon State University, 1982.Google Scholar
  10. [10]
    A.A. Johnson and T.E. Tezduyar, “Simulation of multiple spheres falling in a liquid-filled tube”, Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering, 134 (1996) 351–373.MathSciNetzbMATHCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. [11]
    T.E. Tezduyar, S. Aliabadi, M. Behr, A. Johnson, V. Kalro, and M. Litke, “Flow simulation and high performance computing”, Computational Mechanics, 18 (1996) 397–412.zbMATHCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. [12]
    T.E. Tezduyar, S. Aliabadi, and M. Behr, “Enhanced-Discretization Interface-Capturing Technique”, in Y. Matsumoto and A. Prosperetti, editors, Proceedings of the ‘SAC ’97 High Performance Computing on Multiphase Flows, 1–6, Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers, 1997.Google Scholar
  13. [13]
    T.E. Tezduyar, S. Aliabadi, and M. Behr, “Enhanced-Discretization Interface-Capturing Technique (EDICT) for computation of unsteady flows with interfaces”, Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering, 155 (1998) 235–248.zbMATHCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. [14]
    S. Mittal, S. Aliabadi, and T.E. Tezduyar, “Parallel computation of unsteady compressible flows with the EDICT”, Computational Mechanics, 23 (1999) 151–157.zbMATHCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. [15]
    J. Smagorinsky, “General circulation experiments with the primitive equations”, Monthly Weather Review, 91 (1963) 99–165.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. [16]
    E.R. Van Driest, “On turbulent flow near a wall”, Journal of Aerospace Science, 1 (1956) 1007–1011.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Tezduyar
    • 1
  • Y. Osawa
    • 2
  • K. Stein
    • 3
  • R. Benney
    • 3
  • V. Kumar
    • 1
  • J. McCune
    • 1
  1. 1.Team for Advanced Flow Simulation and Modeling(T*AFSM)Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science Rice University - MS 321HoustonUSA
  2. 2.Tire Research DepartmentBridgestone CorporationKodaira-shiTokyo 187Japan
  3. 3.ATTN: AMSSB-RAD-T(N)Natick Soldier CenterNatickUSA

Personalised recommendations