Advertisement

Some Influences of Geometry, Shear and Walls on 3D Flows at Intermediate Reynolds Numbers

  • H. A. Dwyer
Conference paper
  • 260 Downloads
Part of the Notes on Numerical Fluid Mechanics (NNFM) book series (NNFM, volume 78)

Summary

A study has been carried out to determine some basic influences of particle shape, shear flow and walls on the three-dimensional separated flow patterns over particles at low and intermediate range of Reynolds numbers, less than 100. The particle geometries that have been employed in the investigation are an ellipsoid of revolution, a sphere in a shear flow, and a half sphere on a wall. The method of solution consists of a numerical simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations with a second order, implicit, finite volume formulation, and both single and overset meshed have been employed. The numerical methods have performed well and the results have been verified with the use of simple test cases which agree with available experimental and numerical studies. The computations show how non-uniformities in both the flow and geometry alter the separated flow process in a systematic way. An important result of this investigation is that the fluid near the surface of the particle tends to flow into the lowest pressure region of the separation bubble. Although three-dimensional separation is always complex, the present results form a fundamental foundation for understanding basic processes.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. [1]
    Clift, R., Grace, J.R. and Weber, M.E.: Bubbles, Drops, and Particles, 1st edn. ( Academic Press, New York 1978 )Google Scholar
  2. [2]
    Batchelor, G.K.: An Introduction to Fluid Dynamics, 1st edn., Cambridge University Press, 1967 )Google Scholar
  3. [3]
    Dandy, D.S., and Dwyer, H.A.: J. Fluid. Mech. \textbf{Vol. 216}, pp. 381–410 (1990)Google Scholar
  4. [4]
    Dwyer, H.A. and Dandy, D.S.: Phys. Fluids, Vol. 2, No. 12, pp. 2110–2118 (1990)zbMATHCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. [5]
    Nirschl, H., Dwyer, H.A., Denk, V.: J. Fluid. Mech., Vol. 216}, pp. 273–285 (1995)Google Scholar
  6. [6]
    Wang, K.C. et al.: Proc. R. Soc. London, A 421}, pp. 73–90 (1990)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. A. Dwyer
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Mechanical and Aeronautical EngineeringUniversity of California, DavisDavisUSA

Personalised recommendations