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Beyond Product Families: Building a Product Population?

  • Rob van Ommering
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1951)

Abstract

Building a large variety of products in a global organization, with software development distributed around the world, requires an approach which must not only have a sound technical basis for handling diversity and commonality, but where also the software development process and organization must be aligned optimally. In our case, the diversity of products is so large that we’d rather speak of a product population than of a product family. We find it helpful to use an approach that emphasizes composition over decomposition, and that embodies different types of processes (architecture, subsystem and product development) that are mapped to development sites in the organization.

Keywords

Product Family Business Group Reference Architecture Configuration Management Product Population 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rob van Ommering
    • 1
  1. 1.Philips Research LaboratoriesEindhovenThe Netherlands

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