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Component Frameworks for a Medical Imaging Product Family

  • Jan Gerben Wijnstra
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1951)

Abstract

In this paper we describe our experience with component frameworks in a product family architecture in the medical imaging domain. The component frameworks are treated as an integral part of the architectural approach and proved to be an important means for modelling diversity in the functionality supported by the individual family members. This approach is based on the explicit modelling of the domain and the definition of a shared product family architecture. Two main types of component frameworks are described, along with the ways in which they are to be developed.

Keywords

Component Frameworks Plug-ins Diversity Product Family Architecture Domain Modelling Interfaces 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jan Gerben Wijnstra
    • 1
  1. 1.Philips Research LaboratoriesEindhovenThe Netherlands

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