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NEONATE: Decision Support in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit – A Preliminary Report

  • Jim Hunter
  • Gary Ewing
  • Yvonne Freer
  • Robert Logie
  • Paul McCue
  • Neil McIntosh
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2780)

Abstract

The aim of the NEONATE project is to investigate sub-optimal decision making in the neonatal intensive care unit and to implement decision support tools which will draw the attention of nursing and clinical staff to situations where specific actions should be taken or avoided. We have collected over 400 patient-hours of data on 31 separate babies, including physiological parameters sampled every second, observations made by a research nurse of all the actions performed on the baby with an accuracy of a few seconds, occasional descriptions of the appearance, mobility, sleep patterns, etc of the baby. We describe our attempts to use this data to discover examples of sub- optimal behaviour.

Keywords

Decision Support Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Clinical Staff Research Nurse Cognitive Engineer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jim Hunter
    • 1
  • Gary Ewing
    • 1
  • Yvonne Freer
    • 3
  • Robert Logie
    • 2
  • Paul McCue
    • 1
  • Neil McIntosh
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Computing ScienceUniversity of Aberdeen, King’s CollegeAberdeenUK
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Aberdeen, King’s CollegeAberdeenUK
  3. 3.Department of NeonatologyUniversity of EdinburghEdinburghUK

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