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A Layered Architecture Sustaining Model-Driven and Event-Driven Software Development

  • Cindy Michiels
  • Monique Snoeck
  • Wilfried Lemahieu
  • Frank Goethals
  • Guido Dedene
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2890)

Abstract

This paper presents a layered software architecture reconciling model-driven, event-driven, and object-oriented software development. In its simplest form, the architecture consists of two layers: an enterprise layer consisting of a relatively stable business model and an information system layer, containing the more volatile user functionality. The paper explains how the concept of events is used in the enterprise layer as a means to make business objects more independent of each other. This results in an event handling sublayer, allowing to define groups of events and handling consistency and transaction management aspects. This type of architecture results in information systems with a high-level modular structure, where changes are easier to perform as higher layers will not influence the inherently more stable lower layers.

Keywords

Business Object Business Rule Method Invocation Output Service Information System Architecture 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cindy Michiels
    • 1
  • Monique Snoeck
    • 1
  • Wilfried Lemahieu
    • 1
  • Frank Goethals
    • 1
  • Guido Dedene
    • 1
  1. 1.MIS Group, Dept. Applied Economic SciencesK.U.LeuvenLeuvenBelgium

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