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Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS): A New Spectrochemical Technique

  • Leon J. Radziemski
  • Thomas R. Loree
  • David A. Cremers
Part of the Springer Series in Optical Sciences book series (SSOS, volume 39)

Abstract

We have used the breakdown spark from a focused laser beam to generate analytically useful emission spectra of minor constituents in air and other carrier gases. The medium was sampled directly. It was not necessary to reduce the sample to solution nor to introduce electrodes. The apparatus is particularly simple; a pulsed laser, spectrometer, and some method for time resolution. The latter is essential in laser-induced-breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) because of the strong early continuum. High temperatures in the spark result in vaporization of small particles, dissociation of molecules, and excitation of atomic and ionic spectra, including species which are normally difficult to detect. In one application, we have monitored beryllium in air at concentrations below 1 μg/m3, which is below 1 ppb (w/w). In another we have monitored chlorine and fluorine atoms in real time. LIBS has the potential for real-time direct sampling of contaminants in situ.

Keywords

Fluorine Atom Coal Gasifier Atom Counting Neutral Oxygen Atom Beryllium Block 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    T. R. Loree and L. J. Radziemski, “Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy: Time Integrated Applications,” J. Plasma Chem. and Plasma Proc. 1, 271 (1981).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    L. J. Radziemski and T. R. Loree, “Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy: Time-Resolved Spectrochemical Applications,” J. Plasma Chem. and Plasma Proc. 1, 281 (1981).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    L. J. Radziemski, “Time-Resolved Spectroscopy of Laser-Induced Air Plasmas Seeded with Phosphorus, Chlorine, and Beryllium,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. 71, 1594 (1981).ADSGoogle Scholar
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    T. R. Loree and L. J. Radziemski, “Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy: Detecting Sodium and Potassium in Coal Gasifiers,” 1981 Symp. Instr. and Control for Fossil Energy Prog., Argonne Nat. Lab. Press ANL 81 – 62/ CONS — 810607, 768 (1982).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leon J. Radziemski
    • 1
  • Thomas R. Loree
    • 1
  • David A. Cremers
    • 1
  1. 1.Los Alamos National LaboratoryUniversity of CaliforniaLos AlamosUSA

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