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Use of the Fraunhofer Line Discriminator (FLD) for Remote Sensing of Materials Stimulated to Luminesce by the Sun

  • William R. Hemphill
  • Arnold F. Theisen
  • Robert D. Watson
Chapter
Part of the Springer Series in Optical Sciences book series (SSOS, volume 39)

Abstract

Luminescence has been little used as a remote sensing tool in mineral exploration because artificial excitation sources are relatively low powered. Their effective range is on the order of a meter for hand-carried ultraviolet lamps, a few tens-of-meters for cathode-ray systems, and a few hundred meters for laser systems. The work must be performed at night with hand-carried lamps and cathode-ray systems in order to avoid obscuring the low intensity luminescence by bright sunlight. Luminescence stimulated by laser sources may be measured in daylight, but the luminescence signal at visible and near-visible wavelengths must compete with reflected daylight and background luminescence stimulated by the Sun.

Keywords

Phosphate Rock Luminescent Material Resolution Element Optical Head Geological Survey Professional Paper 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • William R. Hemphill
    • 1
    • 3
  • Arnold F. Theisen
    • 1
    • 4
  • Robert D. Watson
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.U.S. Geological SurveyUSA
  2. 2.DallasUSA
  3. 3.RestonUSA
  4. 4.FlagstaffUSA

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