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Laser Projection Microscope: Principle and Applications in Biology

  • V. V. Savransky
  • G. A. Sitnikov
  • P. N. Lebedev
Conference paper
  • 210 Downloads
Part of the Springer Series in Optical Sciences book series (SSOS, volume 31)

Abstract

One of the technical problems in modern biology is the display of microobjects on large screens. Generally, for this purpose “passive” microprojectors are used, but in many cases these systems provide only an insufficient screen illumination. In order to achieve a good visibility the screen illumination should be, e.g. in the green spectral range not less than 0.1W/cm2. For example, if we want to have a 1.000 × linear magnification of the image, the light flux per unit area of the object must be 106 × as intensive as that per unit area of the screen. This means that due to absorption and scattering losses an energy density in the object plane 107 × higher than the minimum energy intensity on the screen is needed. Although modern light sources can provide the theoretically needed object illumination, the resulting very high light fluxes may have degradation or even destroying effects on the object, especially when living systems are investigated. One of the ways to overcome these difficulties is the use of a laser amplification system.

Keywords

Laser Medium Light Flux Modern Biology Power Laser Pulse High Power Laser Pulse 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. V. Savransky
    • 1
  • G. A. Sitnikov
    • 1
  • P. N. Lebedev
    • 1
  1. 1.Physical Institute of the Academy of Sciences of the USSRMoscowUSSR

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