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Holographic Measurement of Deformation in Complete Upper Dentures — Clinical Application

  • I. Dirtoft
Conference paper
Part of the Springer Series in Optical Sciences book series (SSOS, volume 31)

Abstract

Prosthodontists are responsible for dentures which are well retained, stabile and show optimal fit even after extensive use in order to prevent injury to the underlying tissues. Various processing techniques result in unequal physical properties and behaviour in different directions due to the anisotropy of the polymer. Dimensional changes cause resorption and are indirectly responsible for a decrease in retention and stability. Numerous investigators have compared the dimensional and other differences in some common base materials [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]. Previously described methods for dimensional measurement are sometimes based on repositioning on the mastercast, [7, 8, 9, 10] which may not be sufficiently accurate [11, 12, 13]. The determination of three-dimensional shape by use of a measuring microscope has also been described [11, 12, 13]. Other methods have also been used for the same purpose [14, 15, 16]. In any case, measuring deformations in polymers is a very intricate problem due to the anisotropy of the material, and knowledge of the total deformation pattern of the object is very limited. Holographic interferometry seems to solve many of these special polymer problems in a satisfying way [11, 16, 17, 18, 19].

Keywords

Interference Fringe Observation Angle Holographic Method Object Beam Denture Stomatitis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • I. Dirtoft
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Prosthetic DentistryKarolinska InstitutetStockholmSweden
  2. 2.Department of Production EngineeringRoyal Institute of Technology, FackStockholmSweden

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