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Stimulated Raman Studies of CO2-Laser-Excited SF6

  • P. Esherick
  • A. J. Grimley
  • A. Owyoung
Conference paper
Part of the Springer Series in Optical Sciences book series (SSOS, volume 30)

Abstract

Advances in high-resolution stimulated Raman spectroscopy (SRS) have provided a means for performing gas phase Raman studies with unprecedented spectral resolution (~.002 cm−1) and high sensitivity [1–3]. Studies in static cells at low (≤4 Torr) pressures have revealed a wealth of spectral detail inaccessible tó conventional Raman techniques. Investigations in flames [4] and supersonic free-expansion jets [5] have illustrated the spatial resolving power offered by SRS. In this paper we report a preliminary investigation into the use of SRS for high-resolution studies of transient species. Specifically, we are using SF6 molecules excited by a CO2 laser as a prototypical system for examining These capabilities.

Keywords

Gain Spectrum Stark Shift Transient Species Raman Technique Optical Science 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Esherick
    • 1
  • A. J. Grimley
    • 1
  • A. Owyoung
    • 1
  1. 1.Sandia National LaboratoriesAlbuquerqueUSA

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