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Towards a More Effective and Democratic Natural Resources Management

  • Susanne Stoll-Kleemann
  • Martin Welp
Part of the Environmental Science and Engineering book series (ESE)

Keywords

Natural Resource Management Public Participation Integrate Assessment Participatory Process Conflict Management 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susanne Stoll-Kleemann
    • 1
  • Martin Welp
    • 2
  1. 1.Humboldt University of BerlinGermany
  2. 2.University of Applied Sciences EberswaldeGermany

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