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Policies, research perspective and challenges on multifunctional land use

  • Daniel Deybe
Chapter

Abstract

The Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) (Articles 32 to 38 in Title II of the EC Treaty of Rome — 25/03/1957) has played a major role in the process of European integration. It is one of the first fields for which the Member States transferred sovereignty to the European Community in order to define and apply uniform and harmonious rules. Several objectives were defined at the time: the main one was to guarantee food sufficiency for all, through enhanced productivity achieved by intensive production systems. Other objectives were to guarantee an equitable living standard for the agriculture population, market stability, and food security at reasonable prices for consumers. But it has also affected land use throughout Europe. In this paper we analyse the political context first, then the main challenges confronted by the CAP in relation to land use are analysed, next the responses sought by EU research programmes are presented and lastly, some of the issues that might need a policy response are developed. A brief conclusion is finally presented.

Keywords

Common Agricultural Policy Sustainable Development Strategy Virtual Water Trade Rural Development Policy Intensive Production System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Hoekstra AY (ed) (2003) Virtual water trade: Proceedings of the International Expert Meeting on Virtual Water Trade. Value of Water Research Report Series No. 12, UNESCO-IHE, Delft, the Netherlands.Google Scholar
  2. Huang S, Gale F (2006) China’s Rising Fruit and Vegetable Exports Challenge U.S. Industries. USDA Outlook Report No. (FTS-32001) 21 pp. http://www.ers.usda.gov/Publications/fts/2006/02feb/fts32001/ [01.11.2006]Google Scholar
  3. United Nations (2004) World Urbanization Prospects, the 2003 Revision, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division, New York.Google Scholar
  4. United Nations (2005) World Urbanization Prospects, the 2004 Revision, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division, New York.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel Deybe
    • 1
  1. 1.Development Unit of the Directorate-General for ResearchEuropean Commission, SDME 7/15BrusselsBelgium

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