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The reclamation of the North Estonian oil shale mining area

  • Krista Lõhmus
  • Ain Kull
  • Jaak Truu
  • Marika Truu
  • Elmar Kaar
  • Ivika Ostonen
  • Signe Meel
  • Tatjana Kuznetsova
  • Katrin Rosenvald
  • Veiko Uri
  • Vahur Kurvits
  • Ülo Mander
Chapter

Abstract

The restoration of post-industrial landscapes is often a challenge regarding multifunctional land use issues. Multifunctionality is important from the point of view of both natural capital and socio-economic values (Haines-Young et al. 2006). On the other hand, restoration provides several opportunities for the optimal use of landscape functions (de Groot 2006). In this paper we analyse opportunities for the further multifunctional use of the oil shale mining region in North-Eastern Estonia.

Keywords

Fine Root Wind Turbine Wind Farm Specific Root Length Silver Birch 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Krista Lõhmus
    • 1
  • Ain Kull
    • 1
  • Jaak Truu
    • 2
  • Marika Truu
    • 2
  • Elmar Kaar
    • 3
  • Ivika Ostonen
    • 1
  • Signe Meel
    • 1
  • Tatjana Kuznetsova
    • 3
  • Katrin Rosenvald
    • 1
  • Veiko Uri
    • 3
  • Vahur Kurvits
    • 3
  • Ülo Mander
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of GeographyUniversity of TartuEstonia
  2. 2.Institute of Molecular and Cell BiologyUniversity of TartuTartu
  3. 3.Institute of Forestry and Rural EngineeringEstonian University of Life SciencesTartuEstonia

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