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Amorphous Polymers

Part of the Springer Laboratory book series (SPLABORATORY)

Abstract

Amorphous polymers can be defined as polymers that do not exhibit any crystalline structures in X-ray or electron scattering experiments. They form a broad group of materials, including glassy, brittle and ductile polymers. In contrast to the word “amorphous”, weak domain-like or globular structures can exist, which are often only visible after pretreatment of the material, e.g. using straining-induced contrast enhancement in TEM. The micromechanical behaviour of amorphous polymers is linked to the formation of localised deformation zones, such as crazes, deformation bands, or shear bands, which are characterised by representative HVTEM micrographs. The strong correlation between crazing behaviour and the existence of entanglements and an entanglement network is shown. After discussing PS and PVC, some additional examples (PMMA, SAN, COC, PC) are presented.

Keywords

Shear Band Deformation Zone Deformation Band Amorphous Polymer Semithin Section 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2008

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