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Optic Flow Based Skill Learning for a Humanoid to Trap, Approach to, and Pass a Ball

  • Masaki Ogino
  • Masaaki Kikuchi
  • Jun’ichiro Ooga
  • Masahiro Aono
  • Minoru Asada
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 3276)

Abstract

Generation of a sequence of behaviors is necessary for the RoboCup Humanoid league to realize not simply an individual robot performance but also cooperative ones between robots. A typical example task is passing a ball between two humanoids, and the issues are: (1) basic skill decomposition, (2) skill learning, and (3) planning to connect the learned skills. This paper presents three methods for basic skill learning (trapping, approaching to, and kicking a ball) based on optic flow information by which a robot obtains sensorimotor mapping to realize the desired skill, assuming that skill decomposition and planning are given in advance. First, optic flow information of the ball is used to predict the trapping point. Next, the flow information caused by the self-motion is classified into the representative vectors, each of which is connected to motor modules and their parameters. Finally, optical flow for the environment caused by kicking motion is used to predict the ball trajectory after kicking. The experimental results are shown and discussion is given with future issues.

Keywords

Motion Parameter Humanoid Robot Motion Module Ball Trajectory Side Step 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Masaki Ogino
    • 1
  • Masaaki Kikuchi
    • 1
  • Jun’ichiro Ooga
    • 1
  • Masahiro Aono
    • 1
  • Minoru Asada
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Dept. of Adaptive Machine Systems 
  2. 2.HANDAI Frontier Research Center, Graduate School of EngineeringOsaka University 

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