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Adaptivity for Quality and Timeliness Flexible Real-Time Systems

  • Thomas Schwarzfischer
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 3432)

Abstract

The basis for this work is a model for fine-granular flexibility of applications in two directions. These are the quality of computations on the one hand and their timeliness on the other hand. Dynamic scheduling of quality- and timeliness-flexible tasks on the same hardware platform as the application itself exhibits two obvious sources of trade-offs. The first one exists between the desired quality levels for individual tasks (depending on the processing time awarded to them) and the ability of these tasks to meet timing constraints. The second one can be found between the overall distribution of processing time between the application tasks and the scheduling algorithm. A high processing time allowance granted to the scheduler may leave too little resources for the actual application; however, a small scheduling allowance might prevent finding good schedules according to the given objective function. We use a control-theoretic approach to allow the scheduler to adapt to the current characteristics of the application in terms of workload and frequency and regularity of task releases automatically at run-time.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas Schwarzfischer
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Computer Architecture (Prof. Dr.-Ing. W. Grass), Faculty of Mathematics and InformaticsUniversity of PassauPassauGermany

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