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Open Knowledge Exchange for Workforce Development

  • Peter A. Creticos
  • Jian Qin
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 3307)

Abstract

A knowledge exchange platform, or Open Knowledge Exchange, (OKE) is an effective means for sharing and re-using knowledge among all members under the workforce development umbrella in the United States. The OKE is a necessary step in shaping and pushing forward the evolution of a workforce development system. The authors are the principals for a pilot OKE initiative that includes 1) a workforce ontology that serves as a semantic framework connecting various disciplines, organizations and programs engaged in workforce development; 2) a knowledge base; and 3) user interfaces, and tools and templates for automatic knowledge capture. The OKE, the project will lead to the development of a comprehensive OKE and associated products supporting interoperable workforce information systems.

Keywords

Knowledge Structure Knowledge Modeling Ontology Development Workforce Development Promising Practice 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter A. Creticos
    • 1
  • Jian Qin
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute for Work and the EconomyNorthern Illinois UniversityDeKalbUSA
  2. 2.School of Information SciencesSyracuse UniversitySyracuseUSA

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