Advertisement

Designing Self-Assembly for 2-Dimensional Building Blocks

  • Ying Guo
  • Geoff Poulton
  • Phil Valencia
  • Geoff James
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2977)

Abstract

In this paper we present a genetic algorithm-based approach towards designing self-assembling objects comprised of square smart blocks. Each edge of each block can have one of three polarities (+1, -1 or 0) which defines how blocks stick together – opposite polarities attract, like polarities repel, and a 0 face neither attracts nor repels. In addition to this property, the block contains an internal state machine which can change the polarity of any number of its sides following the detection of an ”event” (for example, two blocks sticking or unsticking). The aim of this work is to evolve block parameters and rule sets of the state machine which allow the self-assembly of desired basic structures that can be used as primitive building blocks for the assembly of more complicated objects. We detail a genetic algorithm-based approach that can be used to evolve the rule sets of interaction for a number of interacting blocks, so that the final shape or states of a structure formed by the blocks can approximate some target shapes or satisfy some global goals. We have assumed a list of simple identical properties for each block, and observed that a great diversity of complex structures can be achieved.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Goldberg, D.E.: Genetic algorithms in search, optimisation, and machine learning. Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, Inc., Reading (1989)Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Wolfram, S. (ed.): Theory and Application of Cellular Automata. World Scientific, Singapore (1986)Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Garis, H.: Dynamic, Genetic, and Chaotic Programming. In: Soucek, B. and the IRIS Group (ed.) Artificial Embryology: The Genetic Programming of an Artificial Embryo, Wiley, Chichester (1992)Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Whitesides, G., et al.: Mesoscale Self-Assembly of Hexagonal Plates Using Lateral Capillary Forces: Synthesis Using the ’Capillary Bond’. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 121, 5373–5391 (1999)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Whitesides, G., et al.: Three-Dimensional Mesoscale Self-Assembly. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 120, 8267–8268 (1998)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Whitesides, G., et al.: Design and Self-Assembly of Open, Regular, 3D Mesostructures. Science 284, 948–951 (1999)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Raguse, B.: Self-assembly of Hydrogel Mesoblocks, personal communication. CSIRO (2002)Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Bojinov, H., Casal, A., Hogg, T.: Multiagent Control of Self-reconfigurable Robots. In: Fourth International Conference on Multi Agent Systems, Boston, Massachusetts (2000)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ying Guo
    • 1
  • Geoff Poulton
    • 1
  • Phil Valencia
    • 1
  • Geoff James
    • 1
  1. 1.CSIRO ICT CentreMarsfieldAustralia

Personalised recommendations