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Modernity, Religion and Secularization in the Orthodox Area. The Romanian case

  • Dan Dungaciu
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Abstract

An observation can be made by any sociologist of religion interested in Southeastern Europe: the lack of attention given to the area is quite amazing. A famous historian once wrote: “Although the Balkan peninsula has played a major role in history, the area has been subject to less intensive study than any other European region” (Jelavich 1983, IX). And she was right. The ignorance or the lack of attention given to the region before 1990 can also be seen elsewhere: the important readers or books on religion — and the most famous treatises on secularization — quite often ignore the texts of the Balkan authors and the materials concerning these questions in Eastern Europe1.

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Copyright information

© VS Verlag für Sozialwissenschaften | GWV Fachverlage GmbH, Wiesbaden 2006

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  • Dan Dungaciu

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