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Zusammenfassung

Seit Beginn des 20. Jahrhunderts wird unter ›Rekombination‹ die (Wieder-)Vereinigung von Merkmalen in einem Organismus verstanden, die in anderen Organismen (wie den Eltern) getrennt vorkommen. Die häufigste Form der Rekombination besteht in der Neukombination von Merkmalen durch sexuelle Fortpflanzung.

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© Springer-Verlag GmbH Deutschland 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Georg Toepfer

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