Advertisement

Inorganic-organic Polymers for Micro-Optic Applications

Chapter
  • 26 Downloads
Part of the TEUBNER-TEXTE zur Physik book series (TTZP)

Abstract

The realisation of microoptical devices is strictly correlated to the development of new materials and technologies. Simple processing techniques and multifunctionallity of the materials is mostly not available by a single but only by the combination of several materials. Materials which are used nowadays for optical applications are inorganic glasses, silicon, lithium niobate, semiconductor materials and organic polymers. For integration, these different materials have to be combined on a single substrate, which leads to very complex and cost intensive processing techniques. The industrial development of high performance materials with high development costs is strongly limited by small market volumes, if the added value of down stream systems based on these materials cannot be included.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. [BAG 90]
    B.G. Bagley, W. E. Quinn, P. Barboux, S. A. Khan, J. M. Tarascon J. Non-Cryst Solids 121 (1990), 454CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. [Bri 90]
    C. J. Brinker, G. W. Scherer Sol-Gel Science, Academic Press, Inc., New York 1990Google Scholar
  3. [DUN 90]
    B. S. Dunn, J. D. Mackenzie, J. I. Zink, O. M. Srafsudd SPIE Vol. 1328 (1990), 174Google Scholar
  4. [GRO 89]
    W. Groh, D. Lupo, H. Sixl Adv. Mater. 11 (1989), 366Google Scholar
  5. [HAA 89]
    K. H. Haas, H. Schmidt, Roggendorf Top. Meeting on Glasses for optical applications 1989, Ceram. Soc. Japan 68. 1Google Scholar
  6. [KAS 91]
    R. Kasemann, S. Brück, H. Schmidt Proceedings Eurogel 91, Saarbrücken (in print)Google Scholar
  7. [KRU 91]
    H. Krug, N. Merl, H. Schmidt Proc. 6th International Workshop on Glasses and Ceramics from Gels, October 6–11, 1991, Sevilla/Spain (in print)Google Scholar
  8. [MAC 91]
    J. D. Machenzie Proc. 6th International Workshop on Glasses and Ceramics from Gels, October 6–11, 1991, Sevilla/Spain (in print)Google Scholar
  9. [NAS 89]
    R. Nass, E. Arpac, H. Schmidt Conference on Ceramic powder processing science, Poster session, San Diego 1989Google Scholar
  10. [POP 90]
    M. Popall, H. Meyer, H. Schmidt, J. Schulz Mat. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. 180 (1990), 995CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. [REI 90]
    R. Reisfeld SPIE 1328 (1990), 29CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. [SAN 91]
    C. Sanchez, M. In Proc. 6th International Workshop on Glasses and Ceramics from Gels, October 6–11, 1991, Sevilla/Spain (in print)Google Scholar
  13. [Sch 88]
    H. Schmidt J. Non-Cryst. Solids 100 (1988), 51CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. [Sch 89]
    H. Schmidt J. Non-Cryst. Solids 112 (1989), 419CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. [SCH 90a]
    H. Schmidt Mat. Res. Soc. Sym. Proc. Vol 171 (1990), 3CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. [SCH 90b]
    H. Schmidt J. Non-Cryst. Solids 121 (1990), 428CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. [SCH 91a]
    H. Schmidt in: Chemical Processing of Advanced Materials; Proceedings 1991 Ultrastructure Conference, Orlando, eds.: J. Wiley and Sons (in print)Google Scholar
  18. [SCH 91b]
    H. Schmidt, H. Krug, N. Merl Proceedings Topical Meeting on Intelligent Glasses, Venecia, Sept. 13–14, 1991 (in print)Google Scholar
  19. [SCH 91c]
    H. Schmidt, H. Krug, R. Kaseman, F. Tiefensee SPIE 1590 (1991), 36CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. [SPA 91]
    L. Spanhel, E. Arpac, H. Schmidt Proc. 6th International Workshop on Glasses and Ceramics from Gels, October 6–11, 1991, Sevilla/Spain (in print)Google Scholar
  21. [UHL 90]
    D. R. Uhlmann, J. M. Boulton, G. Teowee SPIE 1328 (1990), 270CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© B. G. Teubner Verlagsgesellschaft Leipzig 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institut für Neue Materialien gem. GmbHSaarbrückenGermany

Personalised recommendations