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Critical Incidents in Dutch Consumer Press: Why Dissatisfied Customers Complain with Third Parties

  • Jan A. Schulp
Part of the Focus Dienstleistungsmarketing book series (FDM)

Abstract

Customer complaints published in the main Dutch consumers’ monthly were studied using the Critical Incident Technique. Out of 750 incidents two samples on brand promotions and retail promotions of 52 and 137 items respectively were studied in more detail.

Dissatisfiers in the incidents have been classified according to attributes of the promotions and the employee behavior. Customer behavior is described and classified in so far as it leads to complaining with the Consumentenbond. Dissatisfaction is mainly about the intangible aspects of the transactions. An aggravating factor in promotions is the enhanced expectation which is disconfirmed. Dissatisfaction is caused both by attributes of the promotions and the interaction between employees and customers due to negative customers affects and negative perception of service fairness. Differences between the outcome in retail promotions and brand promotions clearly reflect the difference in personal contact intensity. The incidence of complaining with the Consumentenbond without previous complaining with the service supplier is highlighted as a managerial problem. In designing a promotion, ethical viewpoints should be taken into account.

Keywords

Service Provider Service Quality Critical Incident Expiry Date Customer Behavior 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden 1999

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  • Jan A. Schulp

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