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Literaturverzeichnis

  • Werner Skipka
  • Jürgen Stegemann
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Part of the Forschungsberichte des Landes Nordrhein-Westfalen book series (FOLANW, volume 3129)

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Literaturverzeichnis

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Copyright information

© Westdeutscher Verlag GmbH, Opladen 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Werner Skipka
    • 1
  • Jürgen Stegemann
    • 1
  1. 1.Physiologisches InstitutDeutschen Sporthochschule KölnDeutschland

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