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The Dynamics of Maintenance — A System Thinking View of Implementing Total Productive Maintenance

  • Jörn-Henrik von Thun

Abstract

In recent years maintenance has become an important factor for operations management. Total Productive Maintenance as an approach for improving mainte-nance has therefore evolved as the most popular manufacturing concept (Nakajima, 1988; Nakajima, 1989). But often the concept cannot unfold its full potential (Maier, 2000: 377). Reasons for the failure of improvement programs are often based on ongoing dynamic implications, which are often not understood (Keating et al., 1999; Sterman, Kofinan, Repenning, 1997). In this paper reasons for the failure of Total Productive Maintenance will be presented with respect to dynamic implications. The analysis focuses on the changes for the maintenance department and the machine operators due to the implementation of Total Productive Maintenance. Based on the ongoing changes a dynamic analysis is performed to identify important implications for a successful implementation of Total Productive Maintenance.

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Copyright information

© Deutscher Universitäts-Verlag/GWV Fachverlage GmbH, Wiesbaden 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jörn-Henrik von Thun

There are no affiliations available

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