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What Happens in the Barn Stays in the Barn: The Family and the Zombie as Sinthomosexual

  • John R. Ziegler
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter interprets The Walking Dead’s zombies as sinthomosexuals, or queer antagonists to reproductive futurism. They act as queer Others through asexual reproduction, focus on immediate drives, and the presence of the infection in every living person. These zombies figure as alternatives to reproductive futurism, and their mere existence troubles heteronormative hegemony, as do the recurring transgressions by living characters, particularly Hershel and Lizzie’s questioning of the line between the living and the living dead and their willingness to view zombies not just as people but as family. Zombie-Sophia in the TV series represents a disturbing amalgam of child, symbolic Child, and sinthomosexual, and control must be sought by destroying the zombies that encroach on the categories of human and family and suppressing viewpoints that enable such encroachment.

Keywords

The Walking Dead Sinthomosexual Zombie Queer Hershel 

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Episodes Referenced

  1. “30 Days Without an Accident” (season 4, episode 1, 2013)Google Scholar
  2. “Indifference” (season 4, episode 4, 2013)Google Scholar
  3. “Infected” (season 4, episode 2, 2013)Google Scholar
  4. “Inmates” (season 4, episode 10, 2014)Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • John R. Ziegler
    • 1
  1. 1.English DepartmentBronx Community College, CUNYBronxUSA

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