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Insane Proposals: Beyond Monogamy as Beyond Rationality

  • John R. Ziegler
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter examines the actual or attempted participation of living characters in The Walking Dead in queer modes of relationality. In the comics, Carol proposes a polyamorous marriage to Rick and Lori, and their rejection frames her request as irrational, a common rhetorical tactic of reproductive futurism. Carol ultimately commits suicide, an act of queer negation. Negan’s polygamy is misogynistic, competitive, and oppressive rather than collective and liberatory; and it contributes to his defeat. The franchise does include positive depictions of queerness in gay characters and couples. However, Eric and Denise are both killed, and Denise dies in the television show in place of heterosexual Abraham in the comics. Television-Abraham’s death is positioned as more tragic because of his recent embrace of a reproductive future.

Keywords

The Walking Dead Polyamory Polygamy Negan Queer 

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Episodes Referenced

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • John R. Ziegler
    • 1
  1. 1.English DepartmentBronx Community College, CUNYBronxUSA

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