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Biocultural Conservation and Biocultural Ethics

  • Ricardo RozziEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Ecology and Ethics book series (ECET, volume 3)

Abstract

Sustainable forms of co-inhabitation in this world are not only possibilities; they are actualities. However, for their expression, it is essential to undertake a twofold task: (1) to precisely and severely sanction those agents who act guided by a self-absorbed economic interest threating the sustainability of life, and (2) to decisively defend those traditions of thought and communities who favor the continuity of life in its diversity of biological and cultural expressions. For the second task to be undertaken effectively, it is critical to understand that the conservation of, and the access to, the diverse native habitats is the condition of possibility for the continuity of the diverse and sustainable life habits of communities of co-inhabitants that inhabit them. The conservation of habitats and life habits is so critical that it constitutes an ethical imperative that should be incorporated into government policies as a matter of socio-environmental justice. To implement this ethical imperative, it is essential to reorient global society to foster a culture that achieves a better integration of ontological-, ecosocial-, and ethical-biocultural foundations into education, policies, and governance. This triple integration aims to contribute to more fully understanding pressing socio-environmental problems and to more effectively implement biocultural conservation. In order to contribute to this triple integration, we offer the “3Hs conceptual lens” of the biocultural ethic to re-cognize and re-value the multiplicity of ecological worldviews, practices, and values hosted by diverse cultures in heterogeneous regions of the planet that contribute to the sustainability of life.

Keywords

Education Governance Policy Traditional ecological knowledge Worldviews 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Philosophy and Religion and Department of Biological SciencesUniversity of North TexasDentonUSA
  2. 2.Sub-Antarctic Biocultural Conservation ProgramUniversity of North TexasDentonUSA
  3. 3.Instituto de Ecología y Biodiversidad and Universidad de MagallanesPunta ArenasChile

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