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From Biocultural Homogenization to Biocultural Conservation: A Conceptual Framework to Reorient Society Toward Sustainability of Life

  • Ricardo RozziEmail author
  • Roy H. MayJr.
  • F. Stuart ChapinIII
  • Francisca Massardo
  • Michael C. Gavin
  • Irene J. Klaver
  • Aníbal Pauchard
  • Martin A. Nuñez
  • Daniel Simberloff
Chapter
Part of the Ecology and Ethics book series (ECET, volume 3)

Abstract

Biocultural homogenization entails interwoven losses of native biological and cultural diversity at local, regional, and global scales. It is a driver and a product of complex and pervasive losses of biological and cultural diversity; however, it is not yet widely recognized to its full extent. In this book we show how the processes of biological and cultural homogenization are intricately interrelated. A guiding theme is the conceptual framework of the biocultural ethic and its “3Hs” model, which facilitates understanding how some life habits that are being globalized can lead to homogeneous habitats with detrimental consequences for many human and other-than-human co-inhabitants. The 3Hs conceptual framework enables a visualization of the interrelations between the homogenization of habits and habitats and the consequences it has for the well-being or the displacement of human and other-than-human co-inhabitants. In this way, it can inform and provide insights for decision-making in environmental policies, development, and educational programs, in order to foster processes of biocultural conservation and avoid pressing social and environmental injustices conveyed by current processes of biocultural homogenization.

Keywords

Biocultural ethics Biotic homogenization Environmental justice Land grabbing Sustainability 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ricardo Rozzi
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    Email author
  • Roy H. MayJr.
    • 4
  • F. Stuart ChapinIII
    • 5
  • Francisca Massardo
    • 6
    • 7
  • Michael C. Gavin
    • 8
    • 9
  • Irene J. Klaver
    • 10
  • Aníbal Pauchard
    • 11
    • 12
  • Martin A. Nuñez
    • 13
  • Daniel Simberloff
    • 14
  1. 1.Department of Philosophy and Religion and Department of Biological SciencesUniversity of North TexasDentonUSA
  2. 2.Sub-Antarctic Biocultural Conservation ProgramUniversity of North TexasDentonUSA
  3. 3.Instituto de Ecología y Biodiversidad and Universidad de MagallanesPunta ArenasChile
  4. 4.Departamento Ecuménico de InvestigacionesSan JoséCosta Rica
  5. 5.Institute of Arctic BiologyUniversity of Alaska FairbanksFairbanksUSA
  6. 6.Instituto de Ecología y BiodiversidadPuerto WilliamsChile
  7. 7.Centro Universitario Puerto WilliamsUniversidad de MagallanesPunta ArenasChile
  8. 8.Human Dimensions of Natural Resources DepartmentColorado State UniversityFort CollinsUSA
  9. 9.Department of Linguistic and Cultural EvolutionMax Planck Institute for the Science of Human HistoryJenaGermany
  10. 10.Department of Philosophy and ReligionUniversity of North TexasDentonUSA
  11. 11.Facultad de Ciencias Forestales, Universidad de ConcepciónConcepciónChile
  12. 12.Instituto de Ecología y Biodiversidad (IEB)SantiagoChile
  13. 13.Grupo de Ecología de Invasiones, INIBIOMACONICET-Universidad Nacional del ComahueBarilocheArgentina
  14. 14.Department of Ecology and Evolutionary BiologyUniversity of TennesseeKnoxvilleUSA

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