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Status of Climate Change Adaptation in South Asia Region

  • Ahsan Uddin Ahmed
  • Arivudai Nambi Appadurai
  • Sharmind Neelormi
Chapter
Part of the Springer Climate book series (SPCL)

Abstract

Climate change is predicted to have major consequences for South Asia. The South Asian region represents the most diverse ecosystems, topographies and climate regimes in the world. Incidences of droughts, floods, heat waves and cyclones have grown both in terms of intensity and frequency, impacting the lives and livelihoods of the most impoverished and vulnerable people of South Asia. The regional countries and respective governments have all exhibited high level of political will and urgency to tackle climate change by means of adaptation, while committing to contribute towards achieving global mitigation goal if they receive adequate international supports in terms of finance, technology transfer and capacity building. Though several climate change adaptation (CCA) efforts are in place at the national and subnational levels in South Asia, they have so far been fragmented and incoherent lacking a perspective that integrates technological, institutional, financial, capacity, information and policy needs. Focusing on key countries of the region, this review captures the trends, strategies and critical barriers in advancing the CCA agenda. It argues for a regional vision and underscores the importance of cross-sectoral coordination, stakeholder integration, democratic decision-making, building synergies with local government institutions and enhanced capacities to tap financial resources from bilateral and multilateral funding agencies.

Keywords

South Asia Climate change Adaptation Readiness Enhanced adaptation actions Decision-making Institutions Vision Nationally determined contributions 

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© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ahsan Uddin Ahmed
    • 1
  • Arivudai Nambi Appadurai
    • 2
  • Sharmind Neelormi
    • 3
  1. 1.Centre for Global ChangeDhakaBangladesh
  2. 2.Climate Resilience Practice, World Resources InstituteBengaluruIndia
  3. 3.Economics DepartmentJahangirnagar UniversityDhakaBangladesh

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