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Status of Climate Change Adaptation in Central Asian Region

  • Nailya Mustaeva
  • Saniya Kartayeva
Chapter
Part of the Springer Climate book series (SPCL)

Abstract

Central Asia is highly vulnerable to adverse impacts of climate change and extreme weather events. Countries have identified water, agriculture, energy, human health, natural ecosystems, biodiversity, and forests as highest priority sectors for adaptation. This chapter examines current efforts and status of climate adaptation and identifies critical gaps for enhancing adaptation actions in Central Asian countries. It analyses the sub-region’s capacity to cope with climate impacts, making the links to the existing legislative basis and national policies, institutional arrangements, access to finance and decision-making process. It reveals that they share similar challenges to address climate change adaptation needs and development priorities.

Keywords

Climate change Adaptation Resilience Mainstreaming Integration Central Asia 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nailya Mustaeva
    • 1
  • Saniya Kartayeva
    • 1
  1. 1.The Regional Environmental Centre for Central Asia (CAREC)AlmatyKazakhstan

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