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Introduction: Mapping the Role of the Media in the Late Cold War

Methodological and Transnational Perspectives
  • Henrik G. Bastiansen
  • Martin Klimke
  • Rolf Werenskjold
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in the History of the Media book series (PSHM)

Abstract

Surveying existing literature, this chapter argues for a dialogue between the field of media and communication studies and Cold War historiography. Framing the trajectory of the volume both thematically and methodologically, the chapter highlights the benefits of such a synergetic approach for the study of the Cold War from a domestic and international perspective. The chapter also introduces the contributions of various authors in the volume.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Henrik G. Bastiansen
    • 1
  • Martin Klimke
    • 2
  • Rolf Werenskjold
    • 3
  1. 1.Volda University CollegeVoldaNorway
  2. 2.New York University Abu DhabiAbu DhabiUAE
  3. 3.Faculty of Media and JournalismVolda University CollegeVoldaNorway

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