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Climate Change Communication to Safeguard Cultural Heritage

  • Rosmarie de WitEmail author
  • Mohammad Ravankhah
  • Dimitrios G. Kogias
  • Maja Žuvela-Aloise
  • Ivonne Anders
  • Brigitta Hollósi
  • Angelika Höfler
  • Jörn Birkmann
  • Charalampos Patrikakis
  • Vanni Resta
  • Silvia Boi
Chapter
  • 697 Downloads
Part of the Climate Change Management book series (CCM)

Abstract

The protection and conservation of cultural heritage is important for our society, not only in order to preserve cultural identity, but also because it acts as a wealth creator, bringing tourism-related opportunities on which many communities depend. However, Europe’s heritage assets are highly exposed to extreme weather events and natural hazards, which may be exacerbated as a result of climate change. The goal of the STORM (Safeguarding Cultural Heritage through Technical and Organisational Resources Management) project is to provide critical decision-making as well as technical tools to multiple sectors and stakeholders engaged in the protection of cultural heritage from extreme events and climate change. Here, the STORM framework will be presented, focusing on the communication of extreme events and climate change information through the risk assessment procedure, which serves as an important basis of the decision-making tools. Using the climate change communication methodology outlined here, the effect of climate change on cultural heritage specific natural hazards can be quantified and subsequently used in the risk assessment procedure, hereby resulting in an increased understanding of climate change risks on cultural heritage. In addition, STORM-developed technical solutions that aid information transfer during and after extreme events will be highlighted.

Keywords

Cultural heritage Climate change Natural hazards Extreme events Risk assessment Risk management Resilient communication Project STORM 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This project has received funding from the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (grant agreement n° 700191). The authors would also like to thank the whole STORM-team for sharing their knowledge on a wide range of different topics.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rosmarie de Wit
    • 1
    Email author
  • Mohammad Ravankhah
    • 2
  • Dimitrios G. Kogias
    • 3
  • Maja Žuvela-Aloise
    • 1
  • Ivonne Anders
    • 1
  • Brigitta Hollósi
    • 1
  • Angelika Höfler
    • 1
  • Jörn Birkmann
    • 2
  • Charalampos Patrikakis
    • 3
  • Vanni Resta
    • 4
  • Silvia Boi
    • 5
  1. 1.Zentralanstalt für Meteorologie und Geodynamik (ZAMG)ViennaAustria
  2. 2.Institute of Spatial and Regional Planning, University of StuttgartStuttgartGermany
  3. 3.University of West AtticaEgaleoGreece
  4. 4.KPeople Ltd.EnfieldUK
  5. 5.Engineering Ingegneria Informatica S.p.ARomeItaly

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