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Mastocytoma

  • Tor Shwayder
  • Samantha L. Schneider
  • Devika Icecreamwala
  • Marla N. Jahnke
Chapter
  • 213 Downloads

Abstract

Mastocytosis represents a spectrum of disease presentations. In pediatric patients, this broad category includes solitary mastocytomas, diffuse cutaneous mastocytosis, and urticaria pigmentosa [1, 2]. Presentation before puberty defines childhood mastocytosis. The majority of pediatric patients present with mastocytosis by 2 years of age. Both genders are affected equally. Mastocytosis is a disorder of mast cells leading to increased histamine release. Many pediatric cases of mastocytosis have a mutation in the c-KIT gene, which when activated promotes cell growth and survival [1].

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tor Shwayder
    • 1
  • Samantha L. Schneider
    • 2
  • Devika Icecreamwala
    • 3
  • Marla N. Jahnke
    • 2
  1. 1.Pediatric DermatologyHenry Ford HospitalDetroitUSA
  2. 2.Department of DermatologyHenry Ford HospitalDetroitUSA
  3. 3.Icecreamwala DermatologyBerkeleyUSA

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