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Natural Law, and the Law and Voice of Nature

  • Henry Martyn LloydEmail author
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Abstract

This chapter reconstructs the key features of natural law theory as it was extant to the late eighteenth-century French context using theorists as Grotius, Pufendorf, Hobbes, Rousseau, Diderot, and Boucher d’Argis. It shows that by the middle of the century, the tradition had incorporated within it moral sense theories which had earlier been criticisms of it. The chapter includes a discussion of the difference in the period between references to the “law of nature,” which was known largely by reason, and the “voice of nature,” which was known by sensibility and was largely inseparable from the moral sense. This chapter will outline the philosophical context for the remainder of the part and Sade’s critique response to the tradition.

Keywords

Moral Sense Theory Grotius Pufendorf Hobbes Diderot 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Historical and Philosophical InquiryUniversity of QueenslandSaint LuciaAustralia

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