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Juliette’s Ambiguous Apprenticeship

  • Henry Martyn LloydEmail author
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Abstract

Building on the theory of the previous chapter, this chapter discusses the ways in which Sade’s theory of affective pedagogy is illustrated in Juliette’s personal development through the novel from young novice, to libertine master. It shows the extent to which the story of Juliette’s training, rather than merely illustrating or exemplifying this theory, very often works against it. This ambiguity forms the mechanism which drives the narrative of Histoire de Juliette. Drawing on the division in this book between Parts III and IV, this chapter focuses in two sections, first, on Juliette’s ambiguous development vis-à-vis theories of “natural” morality, and second, on her development vis-à-vis “artificial” morality.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Historical and Philosophical InquiryUniversity of QueenslandSaint LuciaAustralia

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