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The US and the Taliban Talk in Circles as the bin Laden Threat Grows

  • Jonathan Cristol
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter focuses on the increasing tension between the US and the Taliban, and the sources of frustration on both sides. The US and the Taliban continued to meet, but they succeeded only in talking passed each other—the United States explained why it was in the Taliban’s interest to expel Osama bin Laden and the Taliban explained why they could not, despite many of their leaders’ opposition to bin Laden’s presence. It was increasingly clear that the US/Taliban relationship was going nowhere and that the only hope the Taliban had to be recognized by the US was to expel bin Laden—and that was never going to happen. To combat their poor public image, the Taliban mounted a public diplomacy campaign in the United States.

Keywords

Afghanistan Osama bin Laden Sanctions Taliban Unocal United Nations Security Council United States foreign policy 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jonathan Cristol
    • 1
  1. 1.Levermore Global Scholars ProgramAdelphi UniversityGarden CityUSA

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