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The Taliban Take Kabul and a New Friend Moves to Kandahar

  • Jonathan Cristol
Chapter

Abstract

The Taliban took Kabul on 17 September 1996 and had a legitimate claim to be the government of Afghanistan. The Taliban wanted a good relationship with the United States for many reasons including fear of Iran and Russia. The US and the Taliban met regularly in Afghanistan, Pakistan, and the US. On 8 November 1996, the Taliban formally requested diplomatic recognition from the United States. Washington had four major concerns regarding Afghanistan: stability and ending the Taliban/Northern Alliance conflict; drug trafficking; women’s rights; and the presence of Osama bin Laden and his Al Qaeda terrorist network. This chapter looks at the discussions and high-level meetings between the United States and the Taliban from the fall of Kabul until the 7 August 1998 Al Qaeda attacks in Kenya and Tanzania—a time period during which concern about both women’s rights and terrorism grew dramatically.

Keywords

Afghanistan Diplomatic history Osama bin Laden Taliban United Nations United States foreign policy 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jonathan Cristol
    • 1
  1. 1.Levermore Global Scholars ProgramAdelphi UniversityGarden CityUSA

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