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The Rise of the Taliban

  • Jonathan Cristol
Chapter

Abstract

The Taliban were founded by Mullah Mohammed Omar in the mid-1990s. The specifics of the origin story vary between sources, but one thing is certain—the Taliban rapidly expanded their territorial control. The United States needed to know who this new group was and began regular meetings with the Taliban in early 1995. This chapter explores the rise of the Taliban and the US relationship with the Taliban from the start of the movement until the fall of Kabul in September 1996. In this time period, the US and the Taliban had a cordial relationship; but the US was concerned both about women’s rights under the Taliban and about the Taliban’s obvious unwillingness to seek a negotiated settlement with Afghanistan’s weak central government.

Keywords

Afghanistan Diplomacy Mullah Mohammed Omar Taliban United States foreign policy 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jonathan Cristol
    • 1
  1. 1.Levermore Global Scholars ProgramAdelphi UniversityGarden CityUSA

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