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The State Pension: Layering and Retrenchment

  • Anthony McCashinEmail author
Chapter
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Abstract

This chapter briefly reviews the gradual evolution of state pensions. It records the failure of policy makers to construct an agreed supplementary pension system and the late adoption of an auto-enrolment strategy. The chapter also shows the influence of neo-liberal ideas on pension policy and how policy-makers reduce entitlements through recalibration and obfuscation.

Keywords

Pensions, Second-tier, Auto-enrolment ‘Layering’ Contributory 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Social Work and Social PolicyTrinity CollegeDublin 2Ireland

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